How to apply FRONTLINE Plus to your cat

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How to apply FRONTLINE Plus to your dog

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FRONTLINE Plus kills ticks within 48 hours of contact with your treated pet and prevents re-infestation.

*Efficacy against ticks for up to 4 weeks in dogs and 2 weeks in cats. Minimum treatment interval is 4 weeks for dogs and cats.

FRONTLINE Plus does not repel fleas but kills them within 24 hours of contact with your treated pet. In fact no product stops fleas from jumping onto pets.

No, FRONTLINE Plus kills fleas and ticks through contact with your pet's hair coat so fleas and ticks do not need to bite to be killed.

FRONTLINE Plus may be used from 8 weeks of age on puppies that weigh at least 2kg and kittens that weigh at least 1kg. Ferrets should be at least 6 months old.

FRONTLINE Plus contains (S)-methoprene which is an IGR (Insect Growth Regulator) and prevents flea eggs from developing into adults, therefore breaking the flea life cycle. FRONTLINE Plus helps to protect both your pets and your home against fleas.

The difference is that new FRONTLINE Plus has a double action formula. It not only kills fleas and ticks on the pet (like FRONTLINE Spot On) but due to its additional active IGR technology it also stops flea eggs from hatching in your home, providing enhanced household protection.

Apply FRONTLINE Plus to all cats and dogs in the household every 4 weeks, all year round, to help protect them against fleas and ticks*.

The FRONTLINE brand is available in most countries across the world.

No. FRONTLINE should be used on dogs and cats only. There are specific products available for other pets, be sure to use the product designed specifically for your pet.

Do not use FRONTLINE in rabbits, as adverse reactions and even death could occur.

When used as directed, FRONTLINE products have wide safety margins for human health. Based upon scientific assessments, pets treated with FRONTLINE products do not pose an adverse health risk to children or adults via inhalation (e.g., during application), dermal (e.g., petting) or incidental oral (e.g., finger licking) exposures.

As with any topically applied medicine, it is a recommended precaution that children or adults do not pet or play with treated animals until the application location is dry. In addition, it is, in general, not advisable to sleep with pets. However, if children or adults must sleep with their pet(s), it is recommended not to sleep with a treated pet on the same day as product application.

When used as directed, FRONTLINE products have wide safety margins for human health. Based upon scientific assessments, pets treated with FRONTLINE products do not pose an adverse health risk to children or adults via inhalation (e.g., during application), dermal (e.g., petting) or incidental oral (e.g., finger licking) exposures.

Wash hands after use. Do not smoke, drink or eat during application. As with any topically applied medicine, it is a recommended precaution that children or adults do not pet or play with treated animals until the application location is dry. In addition, it is, in general, not advisable to sleep with pets. However, if children or adults must sleep with their pet(s), it is recommended not to sleep with a treated pet on the same day as product application.

People with a known hypersensitivity to insecticides or alcohol should avoid contact with the product.

No. FRONTLINE Spot-On is only licensed for use on dogs and cats. If you find a tick on yourself and are worried, contact your doctor for advice.

There are no known health risks associated with applying FRONTLINE Spot-On during pregnancy. As a general principle it is good practice to avoid direct contact with any chemicals during pregnancy and so purely as a precaution we suggest that pregnant women should not administer the product or handle the pet until the coat is completely dry. If a pregnant woman is the only person able to administer FRONTLINE Spot On to a pet, we suggest that they wear gloves and wash their hands thoroughly with soapy water post application.

There is no good quality scientific evidence that “natural” or “organic” flea treatments are effective at protecting pets against parasites, so it is best to use a proven licensed product, such as FRONTLINE, to protect your pet.

Treated animals should not be handled until the application site is dry and children should not be allowed to play with treated animals until the application site is dry. It is therefore recommended that animals are not treated during the day, but should be treated during the early evening, and that recently treated animals should not be allowed to sleep with owners, especially children.

Provided your pet's coat is clean, there is no specific need to wash your pet. If you do wash your pet, it is important to ensure that the coat and skin are completely dry before applying the product.

No, the length of the hair does not affect susceptibility to flea infestation.

Routine grooming would not be expected to affect the efficacy of FRONTLINE Spot-On.

Once FRONTLINE Spot on has been applied it is advisable to keep your pet out of the rain for the next 48hours. If they do come into contact with rain within this period, it is unlikely that your pet would have been wet enough for the FRONTLINE Spot On to be washed away. However, if a pet gets soaked to the skin and reapplication may be warranted, we suggest that you contact your veterinary surgeon for advice.

Bathing or shampooing the animal up to 1 hour prior to treatment does not affect the efficacy of the product if the pet’s coat and skin are completely dry. It is recommended that you leave your pet for 48 hours after applying the product before bathing.

If pets are bathed or go swimming regularly, then monthly applications are recommended all year round. If pets are bathed or go swimming very frequently (more than twice per week), then FRONTLINE Spot On may not be fully effective. This is because the product is non-systemic (i.e., does not travel by the bloodstream) and acts by direct contact with the parasite, relying on the natural oils of your pets skin to keep the product active.

FRONTLINE Spot On is licensed to be used on breeding, pregnant and lactating bitches and queens

FRONTLINE contains the active ingredient fipronil. Once the product is applied, the fipronil is stored in the oil (sebaceous) glands in your pet's skin. It then self-distributes continuously to your pet's hair and skin through the hair follicles. Fleas or ticks that jump onto your pet are killed by direct contact.

No, FRONTLINE kills fleas and ticks through contact with your pet's haircoat. However it will not stop them from biting your pet (it is not a repellent).

The adult fleas that are killed by the spot on used on your pet are only part of the problem. These fleas will already have laid eggs that have fallen into the home, resulting in a home infestation. It is therefore essential to treat the problem in the home (if it is evident that people are getting bitten themselves or if there have been any breaks in treatment) as 95 per cent of the flea lifecycle is eggs, larvae and pupae, and only five per cent is the adult stage which feeds on your pets. If left untreated, an adult flea can lay up to 50 eggs a day. These eggs continuously fall off the animal wherever it goes, before hatching and jumping onto new hosts when they sense body heat, vibration and carbon dioxide. Frequent vacuuming and washing pet bedding above 60 degrees will help to reduce the number of eggs, pupae and larvae in the environment.

If the product was not applied correctly this may interfere with its efficacy. We suggest that you contact your veterinary surgeon for further advice.

FRONTLINE Spot-On is also effective against biting lice in both cats and dogs.

The FRONTLINE products have been shown to have an excellent safety profile, and adverse reactions to treatment are very rare. However, as with any medicine, side effects could occur but these tend to be mild and temporary in the majority of cases- please refer to the package leaflet for details. Always contact your veterinary surgeon immediately if you believe your pet has experienced any side-effects from a product.

Please contact your vet or medicine prescriber for advice.

No, and it is important to treat all pets in the home as any untreated pets can pick up fleas which allows a home infestation to develop.

For dogs over 60kg bodyweight, use two pipettes of 2.68ml (Large Dog pack). This will be sufficient for dogs weighing up to 80kg. If your dog weighs more than 80kg, please seek the advice of your vet.

No. FRONTLINE Spot on dog is only appropriate for dogs weighing at least 2kg. We recommend that you speak to your vet about an appropriate treatment for your small dog.

FRONTLINE Spot On Cat is only licensed for use in cats and FRONTLINE Spot On Dog is only licensed for use in dogs. We cannot recommend the use of any of the FRONTLINE products in a species other than that for which it is licensed.

FRONTLINE Spot On can be used on any breed of cat weighing over 1kg and any breed of dog over 2kg.

No, out of date product should be discarded.

This would be deemed off-license use and therefore we cannot recommend this. We suggest contacting your veterinary practice to discuss further.

No. The active ingredient and the alcohol carrier are not evenly distributed within the pipette. Therefore when splitting a pipette, you risk under-dosing with the active ingredient and applying the alcohol carrier only. This may then lead to the product not working.

FRONTLINE Spot On may be used from 8 weeks of age on puppies that weigh more than 2kg and kittens that weigh more than 1kg.

No. You must apply it directly onto the pet’s skin (not on their hair), between the shoulder blades in a dog at one or two points, where your pet cannot lick it off. For a cat, apply it on the skin at the base of the skull and at another spot 2-3cm further back where your pet cannot lick it off.

No. Even a small number of fleas on your pet could very quickly lead to a home infestation (a single female flea can lay up to 50 eggs per day). Even indoor only pets can become exposed to fleas if an untreated pet visits the home. So it is important to protect your pet even if they only go outside infrequently.

Pets can pick up fleas from almost anywhere, so they should be treated regularly year round to prevent infestations. Make sure your pet is treated before entering the kennel (not less than 4 weeks from the last treatment date) and then continue with the recommended treatment interval whilst away/on return.

The minimum time interval between using FRONTLINE Spot On and any other product is 4 weeks. Please speak to your medicine prescriber if you require further advice.

FRONTLINE Spot On should be applied monthly for continuous flea and tick protection. We cannot recommend using the product any more frequently than this. We suggest that you contact your veterinary surgeon if you are in a situation where you may need to apply more often than this.

Apply FRONTLINE Spot On monthly for continuous flea and tick protection. Ticks have been found to be active even in cold winter months, so you should treat all year round. Remember FRONTLINE Spot On is not a tick repellent so you may still see some ticks on your pet. They should be killed within 48 hours, minimising the risk of disease transmission. Ticks will often drop off once dead, but any remaining ticks may easily be removed.

Removing a tick needs to be done very carefully so as not to leave the mouthparts behind in the skin (which can result in infection). Special tick removal tools and hooks are available- for instructions on removing ticks ask your vet. It is important not to try to burn the tick or pull it off with your fingers, as this could lead to incomplete removal of the tick.

Ticks do not usually live indoors, but can survive for months in outdoor habitats whilst waiting for a new host to feed on. Once attached to an untreated pet, ticks can live for up to 10 days feeding on your pet’s blood.

Protective tick treatment is strongly recommended for animals travelling outside the UK. Before you travel, it is advisable to apply a suitable product to reduce the risk of your pet becoming infected with a tick-borne disease whilst abroad. If you are going to be away for more than a month, treat your pet regularly according to the product packaging. Also check your pet regularly and carefully remove any ticks that are attached. Ensure that your pet is correctly treated before it returns to the UK to reduce the chance that foreign ticks will be bought back with you. For more information on the risk of ticks in various European countries, see www.fleatickrisk.com

Fleas will happily bite humans, and in some cases these bites can cause allergic reactions. Ticks will also attach to, and feed from, people and can transmit diseases such as Lyme Disease. As well as checking your pets for ticks after walks, it is advisable to check yourself too.

Bites can cause irritation and infection, but more importantly there is the potential for other diseases to be transmitted to you or your pet after being bitten. For example, Lyme Disease, caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi is becoming increasingly common in the UK. It can be transmitted by ticks after approximately 36-48 hours of it becoming attached, causing lameness and lethargy in dogs. It can cause flu like symptoms in people and can lead to serious complications in humans if left untreated.

Most external parasites (fleas, ticks, lice and mites) can cause harm to your pet. They can cause direct damage through skin irritation and blood loss (in severe infestations), and can also transmit other diseases (such as Lyme disease, which is transmitted via tick bites). If you suspect that your pet is infested with a parasite, please seek advice from your vet or medicine prescriber.

You should check for fleas and ticks daily, especially after your pet has been outside. Fleas can readily survive in outdoor environments, particularly during the warmer months so your pet could be exposed whenever they go outside. Ticks are commonly found in areas of woodland, urban parks, grassy pasture and heathland, so it’s essential to check your pet if you have been walking in these environments.

Pets do not generally develop immunity to fleas and ticks, so they can become infested whenever they are exposed to these parasites. Therefore, it is important to regularly treat your pet with a suitable product, such as FRONTLINE Spot-On, on a monthly basis for all cats and dogs in your household to ensure continuous protection from ticks and fleas. FRONTLINE Spot On doesn't stop ticks attaching but will kill ticks within 48 hours, minimising the risk of disease transmission.

Ticks are typically found in woodland or rough grassland, although they can also be found in urban parks and gardens. Prevalence is particularly high in Thetford Forest in Norfolk, New Forest in Hampshire, Lake District, Yorkshire Moors, Scottish Highlands and the uplands of Wales

Ticks are external parasites, related to spiders (the arachnid family). Worldwide, ticks rank second only to mosquitoes in disease transmission to pets and people. Fleas are also external parasites but are from the insect family. Fleas are able to transmit diseases such as cat-scratch disease and tapeworms.

If there is a pre-existing home infestation or there has been a gap in treatment, follow these steps.

It can take at least 3 months to resolve a flea infestation, this is because it can take this long for fleas to hatch out of their cocoons and there is no product that can kill the fleas whilst in the cocoon.

  • Apply FRONTLINE Spot On monthly to all cats and dogs in your household for continuous flea and tick protection
  • Use a home spray that contains an adulticide and an insect growth regulator. These ingredients won’t kill the flea pupae already present in the home, but they do reduce the number of eggs and larvae that go on to develop into pupae and therefore decrease the time it takes for the infestation to be resolved.
  • Vacuum more frequently than usual and focus on areas under furniture, nooks and crannies etc. As well as getting rid of the flea eggs and larvae, this will help stimulate the pupae to hatch faster. Remember to shake rugs, cushions and so on, too.
  • By allowing treated pets to access all parts of the home you usually let them into, your pet acts as a walking flea killing machine’ to kill the newly hatched fleas before they can lay more eggs. Because of this, it is normal to see fleas on treated pets during this time. These newly hatched fleas will die within 24 hours, before they are able to lay eggs which would infest your home.

Wash all pet bedding at 60°C to help kill eggs or larvae that may be present.

The active ingredient in FRONTLINE (fipronil) kills fleas by affecting their nervous system, making them hyperactive before dying. These dying fleas often rise to the top of your pet's haircoat, so the presence of visible fleas after treating your pet is a sign that the product is working.

It is also important to remember that the majority of the flea population is in the environment. If you are still seeing a large number of fleas a few days after starting treatment it is possible that there is an infestation somewhere in the home. It can take up to 3 months to fully resolve a flea infestation (or even longer in some cases)- see “What is the best way to resolve a home infestation?” for advice on eradicating a flea problem as quickly as possible.

If you still see fleas or flea droppings on your cat or dog after treating them, it would be natural to think that the flea treatment isn’t working. Like many things in life, it’s not as simple as that! Modern flea treatments, such as FRONTLINE, don't work by stopping fleas from jumping on your pet- they are effective at killing newly arriving fleas within 24 hours.

The flea life cycle is such that the fleas that are seen on your pet are only a small proportion of the total flea population. 95% of the problem exists in the pet's environment as flea eggs, larvae and pupae (cocoons). New fleas can jump on your pet at any time from an infested environment. That is why it is normal to see some fleas on a treated pet. Each new flea takes up to 24 hours to kill. Because it's very hard to tell fleas apart, it's easy to see why some people think that the product isn't working when actually it is continuing to kill fleas – you are simply seeing different fleas each time that will be killed soon. It can take up to 3 months to fully resolve a flea infestation (or even longer in some cases)- see “What is the best way to resolve a home infestation?” for advice on resolving a flea problem as quickly as possible.

New fleas that jump onto a pet will have consumed a blood meal and defecated within 5-10 minutes of landing on your pet. Fipronil, the active ingredient in FRONTLINE, will also make the flea become hyperactive before death. Therefore, you should still expect to see flea droppings and lively (dying) fleas whilst treatment is being used after your pet has been exposed to a flea infested area, more so during the warmer months when there is generally a higher flea burden outdoors.

If you still see fleas on your cat or dog after treating them, it would be natural to think that the flea treatment isn’t working. Like many things in life, it's not as simple as that! There is no product that can repel fleas and so it is normal to continue to see fleas on your pet after treatment as new fleas hatch out and jump on from the environment, but don’t worry these will be killed within 24 hours of jumping onto your treated pet .

The flea life cycle is such that the fleas that are seen on your pet are only a small proportion of the total flea population. 95% of the problem exists in the pet's environment as flea eggs, larvae and pupae (cocoons). New fleas can jump on your pet at any time from an infested environment. That is why it is normal to see some fleas on a treated pet. Each new flea takes up to 24 hours to kill. Because it's very hard to tell fleas apart, it's easy to see why some people think that the product isn't working when actually it is continuing to kill fleas – you are simply seeing different fleas each time that will be killed within 24 hours of jumping onto the treated pet. It can take up to 3 months to fully resolve a flea infestation (or even longer in some cases), see “What is the best way to resolve a home infestation?” for advice on resolving a flea problem as quickly as possible.

Adult fleas rarely jump from pet to pet or from a pet to a person. However, if you are in very close contact, which would include sleeping with your pet, they could jump from your pet onto you. Also, if your dog/cat has fleas, there is a good chance that your home (carpets, bedding etc.) is infested with flea eggs, larvae, and pupae, and you could also be exposed to adult fleas which emerge from the environment.

Dogs and cats commonly develop an allergy to flea saliva known as Flea Allergic Dermatitis (FAD). In sensitive animals, exposure to even a small number of fleas can trigger severe itching and skin problems. If your pet has been diagnosed with FAD, regular flea treatment for all cats and dogs in the household is essential to prevent problems.

This is unlikely to cause direct harm to your pet. However, fleas carry tapeworms, so if your pet has eaten fleas which are carrying tapeworm they could become infected. This is why it is important to treat your pet for tapeworm if they have suffered from a flea infestation.

Besides causing distress to your pet, flea infestations can transmit tapeworms (because part of the tapeworm lifecycle is spent inside fleas), as well as causing secondary bacterial infections due to scratching. Furthermore, severe flea infestations can lead to anaemia in puppies and kittens, while animals with flea allergy dermatitis can develop severe irritation and inflammation following exposure to even a small number of fleas.

No, There is no product that will repel fleas. It is normal to continue to see fleas on your pet after treatment as new fleas hatch out and jump on from the environment, but don’t worry these will be killed within 24 hours of jumping onto your treated pet – that’s why it’s so important to treat your pet monthly for fleas and ticks otherwise the fleas will breed in your home and cause a home infestation. Even a small number of fleas on your unprotected pet could very quickly lead to a home infestation (a single female flea can lay up to 50 eggs per day). Infestations can be a nightmare to get rid of, so the key is to avoid them happening in the first place.

No, it is normal for parasite populations outdoors to fluctuate. This is because flea numbers in the outdoor environment depend on temperature, humidity, number of hosts (such as wildlife and cats) and vegetation cover. If any of these change from one year to the next, you can see an explosion in parasite numbers so that they suddenly become noticeable on your pets (or, alternatively, decrease in number).

Yes. Treat all cats and dogs in your household as each pet can act as a host for a flea infestation. Some pets groom more than others so it is possible to see many fleas on one pet and not notice any at all on the others, despite them being exposed to equal numbers outdoors. If you only treat one pet, any others will be bringing in fleas that then go on to lay eggs and infest the home. This is especially common in cats due to their inquisitive nature. They can explore heavily infested areas before coming home and grooming most of the fleas off before you notice them.

There is no scientific evidence to suggest that fleas have developed immunity to the active ingredients in any of the common flea control products, including fipronil (FRONTLINE). Recent difficulties in controlling flea infestations have been attributed to an explosion in the flea population due to changing weather conditions. Effective flea treatment not only involves continuous year-round treatment on all cats and dogs in your household but also environmental control and regular vacuuming and washing of pet bedding – see the ‘Flea Infestation’ section of this website to help you resolve a home infestation.

A flea that is dying following exposure to FRONTLINE will become hyperactive and may irritate your pet as it is running around their coat just before it is killed. However, scratching could be a sign of many different types of skin problem and if you are concerned about your pet’s skin, we suggest that you contact your veterinary practice for further advice.

The immature stages of the flea, particularly the pupae (cocoons), can survive for long periods of time, potentially up to a year in suitable indoor environments. Adult fleas will emerge from these cocoons when conditions are suitable (such as switching on the central heating), or when introducing a new pet to a previously infested environment.

One in five cats and one in 10 dogs are infested with fleas at any given time, yet around half of the owners do not realise when their pet has an infestation. Unprotected pets can pick up fleas from the garden, park or an infested home – wherever wild animals, stray cats and other unprotected pets have been. Signs of flea infestations include scratching, biting or licking more than usual, inflamed skin and fur loss. If you have a heavy home infestation, people may be bitten too.

You may be able to spot the ticks on your pet. Ticks can vary in shape, colour and size but generally, when unfed they are oval, flat and small, the size of a sesame seed. They can have either 6 or 8 legs, depending on the life cycle stage. Once they are completely engorged with blood they are coffee-bean-shaped.

Ticks can cause irritation and infection at the site of attachment. Ticks feed on the blood of their hosts and in very heavy infestations this can lead to blood loss and anaemia. Importantly, ticks rank second only to mosquitoes in disease transmission to pets and people. This includes viruses, bacteria and protozoa. In addition, some ticks found abroad can transmit toxins that result in the paralysis of the animal.

Treat all cats and dogs in your household on a monthly basis for continuous flea and tick protection all year round.

Yes. With centrally heated homes, fleas can be a problem all year round.

It’s a myth that our pets get fleas direct from each other, this is not true! Pets get fleas from contaminated environments. For example, your neighbours may have untreated pets, or wild animals like foxes, hedgehogs, birds or rats may come into your garden and drop nasty flea eggs which then develop into cocoons. When your pets walk through this area, this will stimulate fleas to hatch out of their cocoons and jump onto your furry friend, who can then bring them inside – which no one wants!

Yes. Even indoor-only pets can become exposed to fleas if an untreated pet visits your home or you or a friend brings in flea eggs on your shoes or clothing.